"The old moon, Cimtar"

Discussions about the 1978 TV & Movie series.
Post Reply
User avatar
Hope It Is The Grog
Flight Leader
Posts: 469
Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:12 pm
Location: a shining planet known as Earth
Contact:

"The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by Hope It Is The Grog » Sun Feb 05, 2017 8:35 pm

Okay, just exactly how does a moon manage to merit the description "old"? It's not like referring to "the old water tower" or "the old First National Bank building." People don't build new moons to replace old ones. And compared to the people viewing them, all moons are immeasurably old.

I guess it's possible that Cimtar was the stuff of ancient legends because the survivors of Kobol spotted it on their way to found the Colonies, and then maybe it was too far away from the Colonies to be seen from the ground, so it was a big deal when they finally redeveloped spaceflight and discovered "the old moon" there. But then what about the planet it belonged to? Why wouldn't the planet be the legendary heavenly body, and also be Zac and Apollo's point of reference?

Maybe it was a moon that used to belong to one of the Colonies and somehow got knocked out of its orbit, in a Space: 1999-like scenario.

What do all you Cylons think?

("It's just a show. I should really just relax.")



User avatar
Cylon-Knight
Site Administrator
Posts: 5837
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 9:32 pm
Location: Kansas City
Contact:

Re: "The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by Cylon-Knight » Mon Feb 06, 2017 6:40 pm

Another excellent topic!

Hummmm... my Centurion programming guesstimates perhaps he was referring to the phase of the moon? New, Crescent, etc. Perhaps the Colonials had an old phase?

Or it was the first of two. You have England and New England. Could Apollo be trying to drive home it was "this" moon and not "that" moon... which that would have been around another planet, and so, no where near. Unless their are multiple moons and two had same name. ... I wouldn't put it past the lowly humans :shock: ;)
"All Baseships are now in range to attack the Colonies."
Image

User avatar
Hope It Is The Grog
Flight Leader
Posts: 469
Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:12 pm
Location: a shining planet known as Earth
Contact:

Re: "The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by Hope It Is The Grog » Mon Feb 06, 2017 7:16 pm

Hmmm... but don't forget the old moon was practically a whole Raider tank of fuel away from the Colonies. If they had given one of two moons that name first, it would more likely be the one closer to home.

And if "old" was merely a phase of the moon he identified for visual purposes, it wouldn't make sense for Apollo to describe it that way again to Adama and Tigh, who weren't looking at it at the time. (That scene also weakens my hypothesis that it could have been just a passing affectionate reference, as in "th' ol' moon.")
"I may move to the command chamber. I'm sure they're talking about me while I'm in here."
Image
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sufferin ... 2291161676

User avatar
137th Gebirg
Flight Leader
Posts: 337
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2009 8:25 am
Location: 42 miles west of COVFEFE
Contact:

Re: "The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by 137th Gebirg » Fri Feb 24, 2017 2:55 pm

Sadly, I think this was one of the great short-falls of TOS BSG and is very nearly impossible to rationally explain in-universe. The writers really had no idea about the scientific concepts behind the science fiction they were producing and were almost sloppy and apathetic with regard to accuracy and precision. Not the least of which was the frustrating confusion in nomenclature and terminology between solar systems and galaxies, the concepts of super-luminal travel, "fires in space" and Z-axis navigation. It's not like these things weren't understood back then - hell, Lost in Space and Star Trek back in the 60's managed to get it right most of the time with some descent writers and scientific advisors.

Don't get me wrong, I love this show to the end of my days (TOS is my favorite over all others), but I think employing a greater attention to detail would have earned it a place of respect among the mundanes and profanes slightly higher than that of "70's cheese" and "Star Wars rip-off".

That being said, the only thing I can think of to explain the "old moon" reference, is that maybe it's their way of saying "rogue moon". There were no other references to planets star systems (or galaxies) or other moons. Just "the old moon" - a single solitary object in the middle of a dense nebula, big enough to hide a fleet of multi-planet-killing Cylons. I'm thinking that maybe it used to belong to a long-destroyed/disbanded solar system, or got knocked out of its orbit by some other large planetary body or asteroid billions of years in the past and it wound up drifting into the nebula that was hiding the Cylon fleet. Or perhaps maybe that cloudy region was a failed stellar nursery (which are very old on a cosmic scale) and Cimtar was the only thing that actually coalesced out of the muck and nothing else did, leaving the rest of the dust inert and disused. Either way, I doubt any of the writers that came up with the wording of that sentence put this much thought into it. If they had, they would have bogged down the story and mired it in technobabble minutia. Their best bet was to simply leave out the "old" as, yes, it really doesn't make sense in a planetary (or lunar) context.
I may appear unoccupied to you, but at the molecular level, I'm really quite busy.

User avatar
johnnybear
Patrol Member
Posts: 42
Joined: Wed Jun 21, 2017 2:58 pm

Re: "The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by johnnybear » Fri Jun 23, 2017 4:48 pm

It does seem strange now you mention it, not that I've ever given it much thought myself! But why would you call a moon old? But the Space 1999 rogue moon theory doesn't come into it as Cimtar seems to be a fixed point in space, maybe a barrier area between The colonies and Cylon space perhaps? A Neutral Zone of sorts? :huh:
JB
Last edited by johnnybear on Thu Sep 07, 2017 1:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
GoldCylon
Founder
Posts: 6795
Joined: Fri Dec 02, 2005 3:02 pm
Location: Sacramento
Contact:

Re: "The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by GoldCylon » Mon Jul 24, 2017 10:28 am

The moon became part of a planetary shift, and no longer was in range of the rays of light cast my the sun. A new appeared and replaced it thus the old moon. :grin: :blink: :blush: :cylongold:

User avatar
Hope It Is The Grog
Flight Leader
Posts: 469
Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2013 10:12 pm
Location: a shining planet known as Earth
Contact:

Re: "The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by Hope It Is The Grog » Mon Jul 24, 2017 9:01 pm

Pleased that everything had gone so smoothly, Shukhov nudged the captain in the ribs and said:

"Listen, captain, where does this science of yours say the old moon goes afterward?"

"Where does it go? What do you mean? What stupidity! It's simply not visible."

Shukhov shook his head and laughed. "Well, if it's not visible, how do you know it's there?"

"So, according to you," said the captain, unable to believe his ears, "it's another moon every month."

"What's strange about that? People are born every day. Why not a moon every four weeks?"

"Phaugh!" said the captain, and spat. "I've never met a sailor as stupid as you in my life. So where do you think the old moon goes?"

"That's what I'm asking you. Where does it go?" Shukhov showed his teeth in a smile.

"Well, tell me, where does it go?"

Shukhov sighed and said with a slight lisp: "In our village, folk say God crumbles up the old moon into stars."


-- Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

User avatar
Croft2014
Patrol Member
Posts: 57
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2014 5:09 pm
Location: Huddersfield, UK
Contact:

Re: "The old moon, Cimtar"

Post by Croft2014 » Fri Aug 25, 2017 7:05 pm

I agree with 137th Gebirg, it's just lackadaisical writing typical of the series approach to science. BG is very much space opera taken from an old adventure fiction mold, in that beyond the Von Daniken concepts it's inspirations were espionage, war films and westerns. Classics like The Guns of Navarone (1961) inspired The Gun on Ice Planet Zero for instance. At this point very few folks who made films nd TV sci-fi were concerned with scientific accuracy and logic. For instance, if there was a big frack-off gun turret on Arcta (awful, awful name!) then the Colonial Fleet would just have to divert in a totally different direction and the Viper crews could fly up behind it and blow the felgercarb out of it.

Post Reply

Return to “1978 TV Series”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest